2019年10月17日星期四

Tsering Dorje Brings A Revolution To New Haven


Tsering Dorje Brings A Revolution To New Haven
Lucy Gellman | October 3rd, 2019


Forbidden Memory: Photographs of the Cultural Revolution in Tibet by Tsering Dorje runs now through Oct. 27 at City Gallery on State Street. All photos are by Tsering Dorje, printed by William Frucht and photographed in situ with the gallery's permission. 

Even before you catch her eye, the Red Guard looks so very young. She faces forward in profile, eyes fixed on something beyond the frame. Her neck strains just a little. Her chin is a set and rounded square, holding so much stress it seems her face may cave in at any time. There is a whole, tiny army behind her, backs raised, uniforms creased, eyes shifting in the afternoon light. They are, in every way, just kids.
And yet, they’ve been tasked with helping usher in the Cultural Revolution, all before the end of high school.
“Tibetan Red Guards in the Teaching Courtyard” is just one of the images on Forbidden Memory: Photographs of the Cultural Revolution in Tibet by Tsering Dorje, running now through Oct. 27 at City Gallery on State Street. One by one, the photographs reveal a largely untold—and deliberately buried—story of Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution in Tibet, and specifically its capital city of Lhasa. They comprise a specific period of work by the late Tsering Dorje, who was an official photographer in the People’s Liberation Army (PLA).
The exhibition is curated by photographer William Frucht, executive editor for political science and law at Yale University Press, with support from Tsering Dorje’s daughter, Tsering Woeser, translator Susan Chen, and Tibet scholar Robert Barnett. From its unassuming place on State Street it is a revelation, bringing to light the violence, selective amnesia, and cultural erasure of the period.

For Frucht, the exhibition’s genesis began a few years ago, when a book proposal from Beijing-based poet, writer and activist Tsering Woeser came across his desk. In the project, Woeser was pitching a book on her father’s photographs, taken in Lhasa in the late 1960s. As she explained, her father had kept several of his negatives, meaning that photographs outlived those years, and escaped complete control at the hands of the Chinese government. 
By that time, she had already published two books in Chinese, from the Taiwanese imprint LocusForbidden Memory: Tibet During the Cultural Revolution and Tibet Remembered, the latter of which told the stories of many of the subjects in her father’s photographs. Now, she was working to get the images and their stories to an English speaking audience.
The images struck Frucht immediately. At the wildly beating heart of both books is a vivid history of violence that has been concealed and suppressed by the Chinese government for over half a century, and a writer who was ready to show it through her father’s eyes. In 1950—when the PLA had first invaded Tibet—Dorje was just 13 years old. The army still took him into its ranks. 
By the mid-1960s, he had become a mid-level officer and then official photographer, documenting a campaign to purge Tibet of Buddhism, excess wealth, social hierarchy and rich Tibetan culture in the name of Mao’s version of Communism. While he later became allied with a faction that fell out of favor with the government, he remained in the army for years.
“But his career stalled,” Frucht said. He died years later, in 1991.

For Frucht, the images were a revelation. In part, he was drawn in because “it’s not totally clear what was private and what was official”—Dorje straddled documentary photography, straight up propaganda, photojournalism and fine art. Several of the photographs went beyond conventional propaganda to depict reeducation campaigns and brutal “struggle sessions,” in which monks, landlords, business owners and well-to-do renters were dragged out into the streets, made to “struggle” under the weight of their possessions and their faith.
In others, Frucht found himself drawn in by figures who didn’t quite seem politically converted, a rare glimpse into the widespread but largely unspoken malaise and ultimate ravages of the period. Through the photographs, Frucht felt that he could see Tibetans splitting into increasing factions, divided first by the Chinese government and then by each other. 
“These weren’t just mobs going after each other,” he said in a recent interview at the gallery. “It was neighbors.”
Even after Yale University Press passed on the book (it is set to be published through Potomac Books, an imprint of the University of Nebraska, in April of next year) the images stayed with him. Last year, he began a push to bring them to the gallery, which ultimately included an Indegogo campaign over the summer before an installation this fall.
In the images, viewers come face-to-face with a history they have likely never seen before—although parts of it feel eerily familiar. In some, Dorje’s eye for propaganda is in full force: a WPA-era sensibility oozes from a print of an “emancipated serf,” whose whole body takes up the frame as he opens his mouth and triumphantly lifts his arm.
It’s a compelling image: the subject looks free and relieved, as if some great weight (perhaps that of material culture, it seems to suggest) has been lifted off of him. His sunhat frames his face like a halo. The outstretched arm, filling a corner of the frame, reflects images from Soviet Propaganda posters also from the 20th century. A label below the image explains that a pen, clipped just so to his pocket, is a status symbol. 

In another, the so-dubbed Tibetan red singer” Tseten Drolma steps forward, her left arm outstretched in a nearly perfect line. Her body is open to the camera, sharp before an out-of-focus crowd behind her. In her right hand, she clasps Mao’s now-infamous Little Red Book. As a label explains, she became known for her brand of music, Tibetan folk songs”rewritten to praise Chairman Mao or the Party.”
Others are hard to stomach as they expose viewers to the public humiliation and public spectacle of the period. In some, monasteries are destroyed, the damage surveyed. Military parades ride through the center of town with intense machismo and swerve. Children pose with copies of the Little Red Book that they are too poor to possibly read.
In a particularly heart wrenching image, Dorje has placed himself at the heart of a struggle session, his camera trained on the wife of Sampo Tsewang Rigdzin, part of a family of aristocrats. The camera is close enough to capture the laborious fold of her body to a 90-degree angle, eyes fixed in the ground beneath her, fingers curled around a tray she must not (but seems doomed to) drop.
As she leans forward, the viewer sees that she has been weighed down by not only her own jewelry and a tray of ritual objects, but also a large box that is revealed to be a bo—“a metal tub used to weigh barley,” as the label explains—fixed to her back with lengths of industrial rope. It’s anti-consumer, anti-wealth rhetoric taken to its most brutal, inconceivable, inhumane point—then carried out by Tibetan soldiers who look like kids, because they are.

“For me, it’s a glimpse into this hidden time,” said Frucht. “I had only the most superficial knowledge of what the Cultural Revolution was … a lot of this is completely new to me.”
He expects that much of it will be new to viewers too. The photographs defy a solely documentary quality: they seem to breathe history right into the gallery as half-reminder, half-warning. Almost all of them contain a detail that makes one stop right in their tracks: a small palm with its fingers outstretched; a face that is twisted just so; a pair of eyes that wander off. In one, Dorje has captured a monk who looks straight into the camera as everyone around him waves on “the new, ‘autonomous’ government” in Lhasa.
He’s not down with the program, and his dubious stare suggests that viewers shouldn’t be either. A label explains that his ostensibly skepticism—or maybe it’s downright anxiety—was correct. Of thousands of temples and monasteries in the region, only eight remained by the 1970s.
“In so many of these, there really is a main character,” Frucht said.

In another nearby, the photographer depicts Zhang Guohua, the Chinese general who led the invasion of Tibet in 1950. In the image, the general leans back just a little, head turned to the left as he makes an announcement. His body seems so sure of its place: hands clasped, veins popping. Sunglasses cover his eyes. Words fly from his open mouth; teeth glint in the light. Over his left shoulder, a subordinate officer laughs and applauds. Only a text beneath the image reveals that Zhang Guohua was ultimately removed by a rival faction. The subordinate officer took his place.
The images are self-conscious in this way, like Dorje knows he’s writing history (and indeed, he was ordered by the army to do so) without knowing how that history will end. While his life ended in 1991, his daughter has since returned to the region, tracking down many of the subjects. As memories of those years have become more distant, they have gone on to live vibrant and sometimes religious lives, their futures shifting as the past becomes, indeed, a forbidden memory for many of them. 
It’s a history that has eerie parallels to the present. While Frucht is quick to say that the invasion of Tibet constituted a uniquely brutal attack on religion and culture, the images resonate decades later, as India’s government threatens to push out its Muslims, Europe warms to its far right, borders tighten as migration explodes, and Democracy faces massive structural challenges across the U.S. and across the globe.
Indeed, the photographs ask viewers what they can do differently in their own circles, to prevent the same hysteria, partisanship, infighting and violence that seem to repeat themselves every few years. 
“I’m very interested in this phenomenon of political hysteria—when people find it suddenly sensible and necessary to to something that they would otherwise never do,” Frucht said, surrounded by the image. “The Cultural Revolution took a particularly Chinese, and in Tibet, a particularly Tibetan form.”
“But you can see some larger resonance, in those actions that we think of as beyond the pale that become justifiable.”

City Gallery is open Thursday to Sunday, 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. or by appointment. Find out more at their website.  

(https://www.newhavenarts.org/arts-paper/articles/forbidden-memory-brings-a-censored-tibet-to-new-haven)

2019年10月16日星期三

唯色RFA博客:愈来愈悲痛……

戈雅名画《农神吞噬其子》(Francisco Goya,Saturn Devouring His Son 1819-1823)。(维基百科)

愈来愈悲痛……


唯色

1、
一天天地
愈来愈悲痛

当无辜的青年被害
我的每个细胞都疼

2、
我原本就爱穿黑衣
现在更有了理由
每日穿

3、
乞食者的主人是谁
掠食者的仆人是谁

主仆在同一片天空下
有时角色互换

有时爱恨交织
谁也离不开谁

4、
他何来这么深的仇恨?
气得脸都歪了

把我们的仁波切
说成“披着人皮的恶魔”

这背后的意思是
消灭就有理了

5、
挥舞着武器
他们狂骂反抗者是蟑螂

为的是理所当然地
白天黑夜地,各种猎杀

6、
据说地球已是一个村庄
可各地何以如此不同?

今晚,离我肉身很近的某处
在放礼花,炮声隆隆

离我心灵很近的某处
弥漫着吞噬生命的烟雾

低头看消息,在西北边,数百人
被蒙住眼睛押上了死亡列车

7、
成年人的他射杀一个孩子
有没有罪恶感?

孩子不是练习射击的靶子
全身高科技的他禽兽不如

愿他每晚无法安睡
愿他坠入十八层地狱

8、
只有恶魔才吞噬年轻的生命
年轻的生命就像被迫献上的祭品

就像许多民族的传说
都有一个相似的是说
盘踞高山或水底的妖怪或恶龙
常常要求当地献祭少男少女
否则就会毁灭一切

恶魔吞噬孩子恶魔吞噬男孩女孩
恶魔把男孩女孩当做祭品细嚼慢咽
这竟成了二十一世纪的隐喻
恶魔吃了孩子就会吃大人吃所有的人

9、
陷入丧失一切的此地
并陷入莫测的时光

我已经尽力地沉默了
已经尽心地祈祷了

但一见到勇武的身影
仍会热泪盈眶

2019-10-1,10-15

(本帖为自由亚洲博客:https://www.rfa.org/mandarin/pinglun/weiseblog/ws-10152019125137.html

2019年9月20日星期五

唯色:社会主义改造之文革中的拉萨改名记(四)

图片翻拍自《杀劫》一书。文化大革命“破旧立新”,拉萨门孜康(藏医院)被改名为“劳动人民医院”。(摄影:泽仁多吉 文字:唯色)

社会主义改造之文革中的拉萨改名记(四)

唯色

3、夹波日变成“胜利峰”

接下来说说夹波日。这是一座山的名字,藏语的意思是“山角之山”。它位于布达拉宫所坐落的玛波日神山的斜对面,与玛波日以及旁边的另一座小山帕玛日,构成位于拉萨这片河谷中心颇为醒目的三座山。很早以前,此山与玛波日相连,地势状如一条龙,风水十分独特,故有传说将布达拉宫建在龙背上,再盖一小寺建在龙尾上,前后相连,遥相呼应,具有镇伏的效果。据说当年清军大将岳钟琪进藏,见这一带风水强盛,唯恐将来招致祸乱,下令用大炮把两山连接的地方炸断,企图打破这里的气势。后来藏人为了恢复这一带的风水,在山脉被炸断的地方修建三座白塔,塔底是进出拉萨的门户,又用铁索和铜铃把前后两处相连,称为“姹谷戈林”,大意为摇铃接脉,反而成了拉萨的一个特殊景致。又有传说玛波日是神山,夹波日是鬼山,所以在两山之间有粗大的铁链串连着,意思是神用铁链牵制住鬼,表示以正压邪,为此夹波日又叫“铁山”。

1960年代,三座白塔被拆,几十米宽的柏油路拉开了两山的距离。民间认为断了神脉,曾想法用经幡将两山连接起来,于是在藏历新年来临之际,虔诚的信徒都要来此将新幡挂上。如今在原址上重新盖了三座白塔,塔与塔之间可容车辆过往。

今天,夹波日更为人知的名字叫做“药王山”,这自然不是藏名,但与藏医学有关。十七世纪末,西藏历史上的一位卓越人物第司·桑结嘉措根据五世达赖喇嘛的旨意,在此山上建立了著名的医药利众寺“门巴扎仓”,因为供奉有蓝宝石装饰的药师佛像,故被汉人称作“药王山”。

但在二十世纪中期,夹波日山上的藏医院却彻底消失了。1959年3月在拉萨发生藏人反抗中共的“拉萨抗暴”,夹波日因地势高拔,由西藏政府的军队驻守,于是解放军157团“炮轰药王山”,并且“攻占药王山,控制了拉萨制高点,切断了拉萨市内同罗布林卡叛乱武装的联系”,而药王山上的藏医院则在炮火中夷为废墟。两年后,在“这里腾空架起了无线电天线,修筑了炮兵阵地。这里已经成了重要的军事设施,成了弹药库,下面有地道通至一英里之外的宇妥桥。”[11]

夹波日的命运不仅仅止于此。当“破四旧”的潮流席卷而来,虽说彼时已无“旧”可破,红卫兵们仍然要把“胜利峰”的牌子插在夹波日的山顶上,以示一座旧社会的山获得了新的生命。以后,为了“备战,备荒”,又在药王山下大挖防空洞。1985年,曾经红旗飘飘的山顶又立起了一座79米之高的电视塔,并且有军营驻扎于山下,日夜严加防守,甚至不允许信徒依照宗教传统在山上悬挂经幡。用一位拉萨老人的话来说,“这下夹波日就完了”。

1966年8月29日的《西藏日报》用颇为煽情的文字描述了红卫兵给夹波日改名的经过。夹波日被认为“在过去封建农奴制度统治的时候,是为以达赖为首的农奴主服务的医疗机关,是残酷压迫劳动人民的封建堡垒之一”,故而“红卫兵在革命群众的支持下,抬着写有‘胜利峰’的金光闪闪的大牌子,在锣鼓齐鸣声中登上了山,山上山下不住高呼:‘伟大领袖、伟大统帅、伟大舵手毛主席万岁!’‘战无不胜的毛泽东思想万岁!’‘砸碎旧世界!’‘我们是新世界的主人!’等口号。胜利峰啊!从今天起,你在毛泽东思想光辉的照耀下,才变得更加巍峨壮丽!”

如今,夹波日的四处崖壁又刻满了形态各异的佛像和长短不一的经文,据说造像数量多达五千余尊,且不断添增,堪称西藏摩崖石刻之冠。九十年代初期,在磕着等身长头从康区到拉萨的云游喇嘛道登达瓦(已去世)的主持下,在不计其数的信徒的捐助下,这里出现了一座用石板垒砌的嘛尼石塔,石板上刻的是大藏经《甘珠尔》。附近的一些洞窟中则香火缭绕,酥油灯长明,祈祷声訇响。夹波日,不,药王山既是转经圣地,也成了游览胜地,朝圣者不绝,观光客也不绝。

4、门孜康变成“劳动人民医院”

藏医学这门古老的治疗科学是西藏文化很重要的一个部分,其历史源远流长。但医疗机构一般设在寺院里,单独运作且由政府主持的很少。如久负盛名的药王山上的医药利众寺,又称“门巴扎仓”。1916年,十三世达赖喇嘛指令创办一所藏医历算学院,一面行医诊病,另一方面培养历算人才,这就是“门孜康”,在藏语中,门是医药,孜为历算,康则指房屋,“门孜康”即医学历算院。

当年的“门孜康”所在位置与今日已缩水许多的门诊相同,位于大昭寺的西面,在当年与建于附近的西藏最早的邮政局为邻。毕业于“门巴扎仓”的当代藏医大师钦饶罗布,作为十三世达赖喇嘛的私人医生被委认为“门孜康”的首任掌门人。西藏政府从卫藏、康区和阿里等地的寺院选派学业优秀的喇嘛作学生,学制九年,前五年学医,后四年学天文历算。所学基础课以藏医学的经典之作《四部医典》为主,还要参加药物加工炮制或碾药的劳动,最后必须经过三次医学大考试和两次天文星算考试才能毕业,其最高学位是在每年的祈愿大法会上,通过考试获得的“迈然巴格西”。“门孜康”还担负全藏妇女儿童的保健任务,并且编写印发每年的藏历历书。

1959年之后,新政府将“门孜康”与药王山的医学院(其实已在解放军的炮火下不复存在)合并为拉萨藏医院,钦饶罗布被任命为首任院长。这位藏医学大师幸而在文革来临的前四年离开了人世,否则,他将目睹精心研制的药丸被革命群众倒入拉萨河里,随滔滔河水流失;目睹代代相传的各种木刻、手印的藏医药典籍在大火中化为灰烬,而他自己也将与许多享有盛誉或行走民间的医师被当作“牛鬼蛇神”而遭受无端的凌辱,这对他可谓生不如死。然而他的学生、同样是藏医学大师并接任藏医院院长的强巴赤列却未能幸免,从其祖父传下来的三代藏医世家积累的八百余册珍贵典籍被烧成了灰,他个人被罢官、游街、批斗,受尽凌辱……

藏医学被视为毫无价值的垃圾,属于再典型不过的“四旧”。藏医院被认为盛产封建迷信的地方,甚至包括它的名字。1966年8月29日的《西藏日报》上说,“这个医院在二十五日收到了自治区师范学校的革命倡议书后,革命职工纷纷响应革命号召,立即行动起来,改变了一些原有的带有封建迷信色彩的药名,废除了过去看病选择日期的迷信做法,并讨论决定将‘拉萨藏医院’改为‘劳动人民医院’。二十八日,全院革命职工在红卫兵的热情帮助下,把带着红彩绸的‘劳动人民医院’的牌子,隆重地挂在大门前,决心把毛泽东思想伟大红旗高举更高举,把我们‘劳动人民医院’办成一所为广大劳动人民服务、学习毛泽东思想的阵地”。

1980年9月1日,“劳动人民医院”更名为西藏自治区藏医院,但在藏人的习惯里,它还是叫作“门孜康”。并被迁址,至娘热路一带。

注释:

[11] 《雪域境外流亡记》,(美)约翰·F·艾夫唐著,尹建新译,西藏人民出版社出版,1987年10月第一版,页284。

(本文为RFA特约评论:https://www.rfa.org/mandarin/pinglun/weise/ws-10172018151727.html

唯色:社会主义改造之文革中的拉萨改名记(三)

图片翻拍自《杀劫》一书。文化大革命“破旧立新”,尊者达赖喇嘛的夏宫罗布林卡被改名为“人民公园”。(摄影:泽仁多吉 文字:唯色)

社会主义改造之文革中的拉萨改名记(三)

唯色

2、罗布林卡变成“人民公园”

对于西藏这个绛红色的佛国而言,布达拉宫与罗布林卡都是法王达赖喇嘛的宫殿。当然,矗立在拉萨这片河谷地带之中的神山——“玛波日”(红山)上面的布达拉宫更为悠久、显著和高贵,它早在1300多年前,图伯特君主松赞干布时期就有了最初宛如城堡的形貌;公元1642年,五世达赖喇嘛建立“甘丹颇章”政权,统一西藏,成为全藏至高无上的僧俗领袖,而他的另一令人瞩目的成就,即在佛经中授记的观世音菩萨之道场的神山上筑建布达拉宫(由第司•桑杰嘉措完成)。规模宏伟的布达拉宫从此成为西藏政教合一的象征,而他自己不但深居于此,圆寂于此,珍藏其法体的灵塔也安放于此,这成为后世达赖喇嘛所承袭的传统。

始建于七世达赖喇嘛时期的罗布林卡,距今已有三百多年的历史。它那包容在大自然和世俗民间之中的环境,总是为以后的历代达赖喇嘛所钟爱。每年初夏,达赖喇嘛迁往罗布林卡的日子,是拉萨盛大的节日,但见明媚的阳光下,脱下沉重冬衣的人们无论贵贱贫富皆倾城而出,手捧洁白的哈达,夹道护送心目中的观世音菩萨移驾夏宫。十四世达赖喇嘛在自传《流亡中的自在》里也忆旧:“辞别我在布达拉宫的阴暗卧室,无疑是我全年最欢愉的一日。……这时节,正值芽萌叶出,到处涌现新鲜的自然美。” 1954—1956年,罗布林卡里修建了一座两层楼的新宫“达旦明久颇章”,意为“永恒不变的宫殿”,是十四世达赖喇嘛的寝宫,里面的陈设颇具现代化,但不料三年之后,罗布林卡竟成为他未来长达近六十年流亡生涯的起点。在传记中,尊者达赖喇嘛这样回忆1959年3月17日深夜,最后一次来到护法殿的情景:

“我推开沉重而吱吱作响的门,走进室内,顿了一下,把一切情景印入脑海。许多喇嘛在护法的巨大雕像的基部诵经祷告。室内没有电灯,数十盏供灯排列在金银盘中,放出光明。壁上绘满壁画,一小份糌粑祭品放在祭坛上的盘子里。一名半张面孔藏在阴影里的侍者,正从大瓮里舀出酥油,添加到供灯上。虽然他们知道我进来,却没有人抬头。我右边有位僧人拿起铜钹,另一名则以号角就唇,吹出一个悠长哀伤的音符。钹响,两钹合拢震动不已,它的声音令人心静。我走上前,献一条白丝的哈达。这是西藏传统告别仪式的一部分,代表忏悔以及回来的意愿……”[8]

几天后,在拉萨有史以来从未有过的猛烈炮火中,罗布林卡变成屠戮之地,无数藏人被当作“叛乱分子”在这里流血丧命,多年以后,在一些建筑上仍可见深深的弹痕,在红墙下仍可挖出累累白骨。1959年的罗布林卡因此成为西藏历史上最为血腥一幕的无言见证。

“宝贝园林”从此名不副实,虽然在1966年以前仍然徒有其名,然而没有了达赖喇嘛的罗布林卡还是罗布林卡吗?大概这也正是新政权所考虑到的,那么以人民的名义来重新命名岂不顺理成章?具有造反精神的红卫兵小将们率先宣称:“‘罗布林卡’原来是达赖以他自己的名字起的,达赖是最反动、最黑暗、最残酷、最野蛮的封建农奴制度的总根子,我们坚决不能要达赖的臭名做劳动人民修建的林卡的名字”。[9]

于是,正如1966年8月29日的《西藏日报》所描述的:“从早晨起,‘人民公园’(原‘罗布林卡’)的革命职工就满怀激情地在门口迎接红卫兵和革命群众的到来。早在几天前,他们学习革命小将的革命精神,经过充分酝酿讨论,决定支持红卫兵的倡议,把‘罗布林卡’改名为‘人民公园’。并将一些带有欺骗群众的迷信物拆除、砸碎,在大门的红瓦顶上插上五星红旗,以表示向旧世界宣战的决心。这天,红卫兵抬着巨大的‘人民公园’牌子走来,他们就跑向前去迎接并亲手接过牌子挂在大门上。这时,全体职工激动地擂起锣鼓,和几千名革命群众的锣鼓声、欢呼声响成了一片。前来游园的职工群众也加入了改名的行列,大家唱呀!跳呀!尽情赞颂人民公园在革命的烈火中诞生。”

而这天,因出身“三大领主”之家,为逃避学校里的批斗,与一位躲在罗布林卡写书的藏文老师相伴的拉萨中学学生德木•旺久多吉,亲眼目睹了罗布林卡变成“人民公园“的一幕。他回忆说:

“拉萨的‘牛鬼蛇神’第一次被游街的第二天,罗布林卡里的园林工人组织的红卫兵造反队,跑来抄我和龙国泰老师的宿舍,把我们的东西全都扔到罗布林卡的大门口,还把我的相机里的胶卷扯出来曝光。当时我拍了不少照片,大多拍的是壁画,像‘措吉颇章’就是‘湖心亭’那里面原来有很好的壁画,但这些壁画在‘破四旧’时都被砸得乱七八糟。我们的收音机也被说成是‘收听敌台’的证据,可说实话,‘敌台’在什么地方我还真不知道。他们勒令我俩在大门口低头站着,站了一上午。当时还来了很多红卫兵,不过没有我们学校的,是别的学校的。他们聚集在一起,要给罗布林卡换上一块新牌子,名字叫做‘人民公园’。后来学校来了一辆马车,上面坐着几个红卫兵,拿着红缨枪,把我们押送回了学校。”

既然将罗布林卡改为“人民公园”,为何不把在1959年“平叛”中被解放军的炮弹轰炸的布达拉宫,改名为“人民宫”或者别的什么呢?这两座往昔的宫殿不都是“三大领主”的总头子“残酷压迫劳动人民的封建堡垒之一”吗?据说确曾有人建议过将布达拉宫改为“东方红宫”,而“东方红”恰是被比喻为红太阳的毛泽东威力遍及四方的象征。后来尽管未曾改名,却把文革中最著名的口号“毛主席万岁”五个大字刻成巨大的牌子,置于布达拉宫的金顶前俯瞰拉萨全城,并仿照北京天安门城楼,在布达拉宫左侧竖立“中华人民共和国万岁”标语牌,右侧竖立“各族人民大团结万岁》标语牌。有一度,还将五星红旗插上布达拉宫,把毛泽东巨幅画像高悬其间。当然,迄今那面五星红旗还插在布达拉宫顶上的。

1979年,文化大革命结束的第三年,北京政府做出调和姿态,与流亡印度的达赖喇嘛在长达三十年之后第一次建立联系,积极响应的达赖喇嘛委派参观团赴全藏各地视察,《雪域境外流亡记》中记录了由达赖喇嘛的哥哥洛桑三旦率领的参观团回到拉萨重返罗布林卡时的情景。其中一段是这样描写的:

“除了新宫那个院子之外,它里面的花园不过是一片灌木丛。这里的殿堂亭阁只剩下了一副外壳,而且摇摇欲坠,仅仅增加了一个稀奇古怪的动物园,里面有些假山和猴笼。二名中国男女领着他们参观朴素的两层楼新宫,参观团听了他们的解说词,这些解说内容有关西藏领袖的生活方式,平时是讲给为数不多的一些参观者听的。他们对参观者说,‘这是达赖睡觉的地方,这是他吃饭的地方,这是达赖会见他母亲的地方。这是他的电唱机,这是他的电扇。’最后洛桑三旦插话了,‘我对你们讲的十分清楚,难道你们不认为我该告诉你们:你们这是在什么地方吗?这座宫殿是我建造的,我曾经天天都在这里工作。’他们没有再解说下去,而赶忙答道,‘啊,是的,洛桑是比我们清楚。’过了不久,参观团从格桑颇章门前经过,这是罗布林卡内的一座大宫殿,曾是国家举行重要活动的场所。他们发现正门上了锁,因此从外面的梯子上爬了上去,从破旧的窗洞里看到了里面的大殿。殿堂里面一堆毁坏了的具有几百年历史的佛像、头像、四肢以及基座四分五裂,堆得高达二十五英尺。导游解释说,‘这些东西是我们从人们手中抢救下来的。在文化大革命期间,毁坏它们的是人民自己,而不是我们。他们抢走了珠宝金子,事实上,假如我们没有保护这些佛像的话,它们也会被偷走的。’

洛桑三旦一想到格桑颇章内的那堆毁坏的佛像,就离开了官方招待他们的地方,大步走到宫殿前门的台阶上向人们发表讲话,这违背了他与中国人达成的谅解——决不发表公开讲话。”[10]

至于今天,虽然拉萨城里还是有人把罗布林卡叫做“人民公园”,但那曾经高悬在绛红色的旧日大门上方,犹如君临一切的巨幅毛主席画像和“人民公园”的牌子早已不见,罗布林卡又恢复了从前的名字。可是,这片到处晃荡着行为随便的游客、充斥着旅游纪念品的所谓罗布林卡,还真不如就叫“人民公园”更为名副其实。

注释:

[8]《达赖喇嘛自传——流亡中的自在》,康鼎译,台湾联经出版事业公司,1997年,页161—162。

[9] 《西藏日报》1966年8月26日第一版。

[10]《雪域境外流亡记》,(美)约翰•F•艾夫唐著,尹建新译,西藏人民出版社出版,1987年10月第一版,页403-404。

(本文为RFA特约评论:https://www.rfa.org/mandarin/pinglun/weise/ws-10082018122034.html

唯色:社会主义改造之文革中的拉萨改名记(二)

图片翻拍自《杀劫》一书。文化大革命“破旧立新”,拉萨著名的老街帕廓被改名为“立新大街”。(摄影:泽仁多吉 文字:唯色)

社会主义改造之文革中的拉萨改名记(二)

唯色

1、帕廓变成“立新大街”

“帕廓”(又写成“八廓”)是一个具有宗教意味的名字。按照译为藏、汉、英三种文字的《拉萨八廓街区古建筑物简介》的介绍,“拉萨市有三层转经道:围绕大昭寺内各殿堂的廊道为内转经道;围绕大昭寺的路线为中转经道;东至清真寺,南为林廓路,西到药王山,北以小昭寺范围内的拉萨市中心区的路线为廓(即外转经道,全长约10公里)。由此中转经道即叫‘八廓’。” [4]

也就是说,帕廓是因大昭寺而形成,其最早的雏形是在壁画上可见的那些在七世纪时候的大昭寺周围犹如堡垒似的石屋和篷帐。在过去很长一段时间里,这里是拉萨唯一的一个社区。如书中所记载的,“八廓街铺石而成的路面有一公里,其两侧林立的商店、民居、庙堂和马厩等整齐的建筑群围绕着大昭寺,其风格特色格外引人注目,成为来自四面八方的香客、商贾、集市和举行庆典活动的中心场所。” [5]在这条街上,既缭绕着世俗生活的日常气息,又洋溢着脱离世俗的宗教追求,炊烟与香火、锱铢与供养、家常与佛事十分和谐地联系在一起。而在外来的新政权尚未接替之前的西藏,这条街上还设立的有一些旧政权的机构,如“郎孜厦”(“原为堆龙郎孜德巴在拉萨的住地而称为‘郎孜厦’。建立甘丹颇章政权后改为拉萨市法院,第二层为办公地,第一层作监狱,现列为文物保护单位。”[6]在习惯上,“郎孜厦”被视作是市政府的监狱)、医院、邮局、军营、警察局和市政府等,因此帕廓不仅仅是提供转经礼佛的环行之街,而且是整个西藏社会全貌的一个缩影。

不过,帕廓街这个地名在汉语里经常被称为“八角街”(汉语拼音发音为“Ba Jiao Jie”),而这个容易产生歧义的错误发音,传说源于1950年大军进入西藏的中国人民解放军当中的四川士兵,或许更早,可以追溯至清朝驻藏大臣时代,但肯定与四川人有关,因为在四川话里,“角”被念作“Guo”,于是帕廓街变成“八角街”也就不足为怪,但它的含意绝非指这条街有八个角,它原本的藏语发音也不是“Ba Jiao Jie”。然而1966年8月28日这一天,帕廓街,不,被四川人最早叫成“八角街”的这条老街,以一个充满革命意味的新名字取代了宗教含义的旧名字,不管是“帕廓街”还是“八角街”,这条街从此改名为“立新大街”了,藏语发音为“萨珠朗钦”。

就像“革命”、“阶级敌人”、“斗私批修”、“无产阶级专政”、“资产阶级路线”等等意识形态化的概念,在藏文中并不能找到相应的定义,在当时要把这“立新”二字翻译成藏文并不容易。我们无法想象当时的革命者们是如何绞尽脑汁,才在语言的汪洋大海之中寻找到了勉强可以解释“立新”的两个词汇,继而拼凑起来,在饱含“旧文化”的藏文中生造出、硬插入又一个崭新的词汇。我们也无法知道当时的广大人民群众是如何艰难地念诵并牢记诸如此类的一个个生涩的词汇,以至于有时会闹出把“方向性”发音成藏语中的“猪肉”、把“路线性”发音成藏语中的“羊肉”这样的笑话。那时候,从未有过的新词一个个不断地涌现出来,天性爱作乐的藏族人为了加强记忆力而编造的笑话也一个个不断地涌现出来。新生事物层出不穷。

其实在这个世界上不只是西藏人要面临“立新”的问题,犹太作家埃利•威塞尔在《论文化与艺术中的革命》一文中写到:“在20年代与30年代有过许多关于革命的谈论——几乎像今天一样多,多得甚至让一哈西德教派的拉比,尽管他生活在国际时事的边缘,也决定去打听一下。但当时他在他虔诚的信徒中询问:‘一场革命,那是什么呢?’时,却没有一个人能够给它下个定义,因为这一概念并未在《塔木德经》文学中出现过。从没有这么好奇过,这位拉比要求见一下某位犹太人,一个职业的教授,享有开明的盛誉。‘好像你对我们哈西德教徒不理解的事情有兴趣:告诉我,一场革命是什么?’‘你真想知道吗?’教授怀疑。‘好吧,是这么回事。当无产阶级开始与腐朽的统治阶级展开了一场斗争,一个辩证形势就发展起来,它使群众政党化并引发了一种社会经济的变化……’‘我真不幸,’拉比打断道。‘以前我有一个词不认识。现在,因为你,我有五个词不认识了。’”[7]

肯定有很多藏人并不认识“立新大街”这个新名字,即使它已经翻译成了藏文。肯定有很多藏人并不习惯“萨珠朗钦”这个新名字,即使这已是藏语发音。就像当年有许许多多的孩子们,他们不再叫多吉、巴桑、尼玛、曲珍,而改叫卫东、胜利、红旗、永红之类。就像有一家如今已开了多个分店的甜茶馆,更有名气的不是它的甜茶和藏面,而是它的名字“革命”。其实它本来的名字叫做“清真饭馆”,因为老板是信奉伊斯兰教的已经几代居住拉萨并与藏人通婚的“藏回”。而“革命”是老板早已病故的弟弟的名字。老板说,她的弟弟原名叫伊苏巴,文革时改名为“革命”,那时他才七八岁。“革命”于1980年代开张,生意非常好。

还有一些街道也改了名字,如:朵森格(石狮子)改为新华路、宇妥(如同绿松石的房顶)改为人民路、坚斯厦(又写江思夏,“坚斯”意为达赖喇嘛陛下的目光,“厦”意为布达拉宫东面)改为北京路。各居委会也改了名字,如:八角街居委会改为“立新”居委会、丹杰林居委会改为“光明”居委会、河坝林居委会改为“东方红”居委会,等等。显而易见,拉萨已经陷入一大堆与自己的历史、传统和文化完全无关的新名词之中。

光阴流转,风水流转,当“神界轮回”再度逆转的时候,“立新大街”这个名字被取缔了。据曾经当过八角街居委会主任的一位妇人回忆:“1959年以后,我们这个居委会叫八角街居委会,文革时候改为立新居委会,后来又叫八角街居委会了。记得是1981年前后,三中全会已经开过了,城关区群培区长说还是用老名字吧,新名字不适合了。就这样,名字换来换去,又变回去了。”于是,曾经贴满大字报和漫画、曾经游斗“牛鬼蛇神”的“立新大街”,如今又是藏人口中的“帕廓”了,又是汉人口中的“八角街”了,又是一条转经的宗教街和做买卖的商业街了,如今更是中国游客熙熙攘攘的景区或迪士尼乐园之街,也是武警、特警、公安、便衣、线人以及监控摄像头最多的街。

注释:

[4] 《拉萨八廓街区古建筑物简介》,由“西藏文化发展公益基金会”编写,页10。

[5] 《拉萨八廓街区古建筑物简介》,由“西藏文化发展公益基金会”编写,页10。

[6] 《拉萨八廓街区古建筑物简介》,由“西藏文化发展公益基金会”编写,页20。

[7] 《一个犹太人在今天》,(美)埃利•威塞尔著,作家出版社,1998年,页279-280。

(本文为RFA特约评论:https://www.rfa.org/mandarin/pinglun/weise/ws-09252018130255.html

唯色:社会主义改造之文革中的拉萨改名记(一)

图片翻拍自《杀劫》一书。文化大革命“破旧立新”,拉萨著名的老街帕廓被改名为“立新大街”。(摄影:泽仁多吉 文字:唯色)


社会主义改造之文革中的拉萨改名记(一)


唯色

奥威尔在《1984》的附录“新话的原则”中写道:“新话的目的,不仅是……提供一种适于他们的世界观和智力习惯的表达手段,而且是要消除所有其他的思考模式。这样在新话被采用、老话被遗忘之后,异端思想……就根本是不可思想的了,至少只要思想还依赖文字,那就会这样。”“一旦老话被完全取代,与旧世界的联系就完全割断。历史已经做了改头换面的书写……”

而最近发生在天朝强国的新鲜事之一,具有黑色幽默效果的是,据说为了“响应社会主义核心价值观”,中国的一个民谣乐队原本名为“反骨”,却不得不改成“正骨”,随后,“音乐圈纷纷响应组织号召,完成了社会主义改造”,比如,“逃跑计划”改为“长征乐队”,“万能青年旅店”改为“社会主义青年旅社(国营)”,“惘闻乐队”改为“新闻联播乐队”……当然这些所谓改名是一种恶搞,我也兴致盎然地参与了这个“社会主义改造”,其实是友人给我改的名,建议把“唯色”改成“唯一红色”。

笑喷归笑喷。其实社会主义改造一直在进行之中,并没有改变。改变的只是新话。比如文化大革命有“破旧立新”,而今换成了“社会主义核心价值观”,换汤不换药。对此我是有研究和心得的。因为我在依据我父亲拍摄的数百张西藏文革照片,而做的有关西藏文革的调查、采访和写作,最终完成的《杀劫》图文书(台湾大块文化2006年出版,2016年再版)中,有一章即是以多幅传统旧迹被改了新名字的照片来展示所谓的“破旧立新”。

是的,“破旧立新”的标志之一正是改名字。这甚至是重要标志之一。在1966年的“红八月”[1]及其之后接踵而至,风行全中国包括已成为“自古以来不可分割的一部分”的图伯特。这是因为从毛泽东的革命小将的口中,响彻当时整个中国的两个“非常化”——“非常无产阶级化”和“非常革命化”,由意识形态的口号变成了两把所向披靡的快刀,在一往无前、左奔右突的挥舞和砍杀下,但凡“四旧”几乎无一逃脱被“非常化”的命运。摒弃旧的名字,更换新的名字,这是建立一个新世界所需要的必要形式。改名成为革命的风尚,不但街道改名,商店改名,乡村改名,甚至人人都要改名。

而在1966年8月的拉萨,正如当月29日的《西藏日报》所言:“一个‘破旧立新’的无产阶级革命浪潮,正以汹涌澎湃之势,席卷拉萨全城。”然而出现了一种奇怪的现象,不论报纸或广播等媒体,对其中一个革命浪潮,也即“红卫兵和革命群众”是如何将诸如大昭寺之类的“四旧”轰轰烈烈地“非常化”,不但不大张旗鼓地宣传,甚至只字不提;而对另一个革命浪潮,比如给那些旧的事物——用一本文革研究专著中的话来描述,就是“红卫兵‘一看就怒火冲天,再也无法容忍’的街名、店名、商标名、人名、菜名、房名、……都被他们‘革命化’了”[2]——或者给即将出现的新事物,赋予一个具有革命意味的新名字,反倒大书特书。这是为什么呢?是不是有些事情只能做不能说,而有些事情则可以昭示天下,大肆张扬呢?

把改名字列入“破旧立新”的项目之一实在是用心深远。表面看,所谓的改名字很形式化,无非是将两个“非常化”渲染成一种铺天盖地的新气象而已,其实并非那么简单。什么是姓名?姓名仅仅是一种符号吗?最初的姓名在根本上与什么密切相关?——历史,传统,以及某种类似个性的风格吗?那么,改名字是不是证明了这样一个结论——正如捷克作家克里玛所言:“采用新名字来标识街道说明了想洗刷那些不能洗刷的某些东西的企图——它自己的过去,它自己的历史,一种似乎成为巨大负担的历史”?[3]

而在这样的革命行动中,首当其冲的自然是传统。这是不能忽略的。因为改名字(这里说的是文化大革命时候的改名字)的矛头直接对准的并且予以重创的就是传统。且不说在中国各地被“非常化”的有多少古老的中国传统文化,就说在整个图伯特,同样被“非常化”的亦不知有多少象征图伯特传统文化的事物,比如帕廓,比如罗布林卡,比如夹波日,比如门孜康,等等。

注释:

[1] “中国的红卫兵自豪地把一九六六年八月称为‘红八月’,当时有几千个北京人被红卫兵杀害。还有大批人被打后自杀。但是,即使在文革后,他们的名字和死亡都没有被媒体报道。对文革受难者,当局只报道高级干部和社会名人的做法,使得他们成为无声无息的受难者。文革的大图景也被扭曲了。可是,‘红八月’红卫兵杀戮的铁证并没有消失。人们也不会忘记,毛泽东给清华大学附中红卫兵以及北京大学附中‘红旗战斗小组’表示热烈支持。接着,北京校园的暴力迅速蔓延。八月五日,师大女附中的红卫兵把副校长卞仲耘在校园打死。八月十八日,毛泽东在天安门广场接见一百万红卫兵庆祝文化大革命。万众瞩目之中,北京师大女附中学生宋彬彬给毛泽东戴上了红卫兵袖章,北大附中女生彭小蒙代表红卫兵发表讲话。会后,红卫兵暴力急速升级。……同时,被打对象从教育界扩展到和平居民。”——《文革红八月铁证渗血》,作者王友琴,转自www.epochtimes.com/gb/1/2/15/n47858.htm。

[2] 《“文化大革命”十年史》,高皋、严家其著,天津人民出版社出版,1986年,页61。

[3] 《布拉格精神》,(捷)克里玛著,崔卫平译,作家出版社,1998年,页48—49。

(本文为RFA特约评论:https://www.rfa.org/mandarin/pinglun/weise/ws-09202018102054.html

2019年8月24日星期六

唯色RFA博客:这让人扑哧一乐却似乎有效的洗脑术啊

这是从设为“爱国主义教育基地”的朗孜厦窗口看见的帕廓街。(唯色2018年4月拍摄)

这让人扑哧一乐却似乎有效的洗脑术啊

唯色


这让人扑哧一乐却似乎有效的洗脑术啊,正如那本书[1]
写的:“……反复在喂食前摇铃,它们就会对铃声做出反应,分泌唾液。”
最终变成留声机,“任凭主人摆布,把它们的唱针放在唱片上”。

“把它们的唱针放在唱片上”,
比如在这个改成了“爱国主义教育基地”的朗孜厦[2]
数间阴森森的牢房,数个惨兮兮的塑像,一些简陋的刑具,不足为奇。
从挂在墙上的几个小小的扩音器,传出三段字正腔圆的普通话:

“有的人怀着一线希望,
在墙上刻下了计算关押时间的符号,
但是一天一天,是多么漫长的日子。”

“旧西藏有许多野蛮而残酷的刑罚,这里曾有不同的刑具,
实施剜眼、砍手、断足、剥皮等酷刑。”

“这是朗孜厦唯一的一间办公室,
负责向百姓征税、征粮、征差。”

配着单调的音乐,这三段普通话一直在循环、循环、循环,
起初让人哑然失笑,因为情节大多虚构,听久了就有点抓狂,
犹如并不锋利的刀片,一直在锲而不舍地,割着耳朵,割着
脑神经,割着灵魂……“把它们的唱针放在唱片上”。

离去时,门口有两个小女孩抱着一本登记簿,
在替上厕所的母亲值班。大的秀丽,脸颊红彤彤,小的亦好看。
“藏族人不登记,汉族人登记”,女孩认真地说。
为什么?她俩懵懂不知。以此证明洗脑术的神效么?

对面是一座佛殿,安置着一个巨大的、铜质的转经筒,
装有佛陀的无尽话语,人们以顺时针方向推动着,碰撞出清脆铃声。
又闻远处传来报时声,哦“四月间,天气寒冷晴朗,钟敲了十三下”[3] ……

2018-4-14,拉萨

注释:
[1] 即(英)多米尼克·斯垂特菲尔德《洗脑术:思想控制的荒唐史》,张孝铎译。
[2] 朗孜厦:སྣང་རྩེ་ཤགNangtseshar),原为图伯特政府甘丹颇章政权时的拉萨法院,第一层为监狱,第二层为办公地,位于拉萨八廓北路的一座三层藏式建筑,南面是大昭寺。现被列为“文物保护单位”和“爱国主义教育基地”。

--> [3] 引自(英)乔治·奥威尔的小说《1984》第一句,董乐山译。
本文为RFA唯色博客:https://www.rfa.org/mandarin/pinglun/weiseblog/ws-08072019154906.html